Course Library Forums I Challenge You! Inbox Zero in One Week

  • Inbox Zero in One Week

    updated 5 years, 1 month ago 0 Member · 41 Posts
  • Jarrod Robinson

    Administrator
    January 7, 2016 at 6:16 am

    It’s no secret that I am a major fan of technology. I love learning about everything and most importantly sharing as much of it as I can with everyone here at the blog. However, I often get asked about how long I spend on my computer researching and using the various tools and engaging in various social networks. It must be hours and hours per day??

    Well, the truth is that once upon a time, this might have been true. However over the last two years my digital life and productivity revolving around it has been transformed, by some super simple yet powerful practices.

    So let’s help you achieve the elusive Inbox Zero

    Inbox Zero

    Email is one of biggest culprits zapping our daily attention levels. After all, email is the “To Do List” from other people demanding your attention. Therefore, each day you’re left with a mental burden of tasks that you need to act on, which build up over time resulting in an email count that looks like the following. YUCK.

    This was certainly once the state of affairs for my email accounts. However, for the last 18 months I have finished the end of every day having achieved ‘Inbox Zero‘. For those unfamiliar, inbox zero is a rigorous approach to email management aimed at keeping the inbox empty — or almost empty — at all times.

    Now bear in mind that I receive over 200 emails per day through my various email accounts. However, I have rigorously applied the Inbox Zero philosophies to achieve it every day.

    To help me make this happen I utilize the incredible software product ‘Active Inbox’, which follows the basic premise of delete, delegate, respond, defer and do.

    I schedule in my email management 2-3 times throughout the day and follow the steps outlined below.

    • Turn all notifications off and don’t leave the email client open.
    • Process email in blocks throughout the day, for me this morning, sometimes lunch and evening. On the weekends, it usually moves to once per day.
    • First delete or archive as many new messages as possible. You can also unsubscribe to newsletters you don’t read
    • You should forward what can be best answered by someone else to someone else.
    • Immediately respond to any new messages that can be responded to in two minutes or less.
    • Move new messages that require more than two minutes to answer — and messages that can be answered later — to a separate “requires response” folder. This is what ‘Active Inbox’ automates for me.
    • Set aside time each day to respond to email in the “requires response” folder. I process this folder at the end of the day.

    The net result of this disciplined approach is hard to explain. However, I guaranteed finishing the day with an empty inbox is something you will become addicted too.

    I challenge you to do the following

    1. Declare Email Bankruptcy on your overflowing unread emails by deleting or archiving them all. You can now start fresh with the Inbox Zero principles.
    2. Yes – I’m serious DO IT

    Let me know how you go in the comments below

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    January 7, 2016 at 1:43 pm

    Funny that you should post this as one of my main priorities over Christmas was to get Inbox Zero. I have achieved it but already the inbox is filling again. Never heard of Active Inbox so will be giving that a go.

  • Jarrod Robinson

    Administrator
    January 7, 2016 at 11:03 pm
    ChrisBailey, post: 178, member: 86 wrote:
    Funny that you should post this as one of my main priorities over Christmas was to get Inbox Zero. I have achieved it but already the inbox is filling again. Never heard of Active Inbox so will be giving that a go.

    Let’s see if we can get it back to zero

    Post a picture when you’re sitting on ZERO

  • Brendon Breen

    Member
    January 9, 2016 at 10:04 pm

    I’m in for the challenge. Will check out the active inbox. I have been working to the number 10 or less in my inbox for the last few months and that has felt good. Issue is that two or three emails that are fairly old just sit there. This challenge will help me get rid of them.

  • Jarrod Robinson

    Administrator
    January 10, 2016 at 10:22 pm
    BrendonBreen, post: 188, member: 46 wrote:
    I’m in for the challenge. Will check out the active inbox. I have been working to the number 10 or less in my inbox for the last few months and that has felt good. Issue is that two or three emails that are fairly old just sit there. This challenge will help me get rid of them.

    ACTIVE Inbox will help you get rid of those – if you follow the simple steps below you should be all set

    • Turn all notifications off and don’t leave the email client open.
    • Process email in blocks throughout the day, for me this morning, sometimes lunch and evening. On the weekends, it usually moves to once per day.
    • First delete or archive as many new messages as possible. You can also unsubscribe to newsletters you don’t read
    • You should forward what can be best answered by someone else to someone else.
    • Immediately respond to any new messages that can be responded to in two minutes or less.
    • Move new messages that require more than two minutes to answer — and messages that can be answered later — to a separate “requires response” folder. This is what ‘Active Inbox’ automates for me.
    • Set aside time each day to respond to email in the “requires response” folder. I process this folder at the end of the day.

    When you get a chance, copy/paste a screenshot of your emails inside this thread :)

  • Lisa

    Member
    January 17, 2016 at 7:34 pm

    Okay, this would be an amazing feat ~ to have inbox zero! I am truthfully thinking, “not possible.”
    Well, I will take a look at ACTIVE inbox and check back in o_O

  • Jarrod Robinson

    Administrator
    January 18, 2016 at 4:41 am
    LisaBell, post: 225, member: 106 wrote:
    Okay, this would be an amazing feat ~ to have inbox zero! I am truthfully thinking, “not possible.”
    Well, I will take a look at ACTIVE inbox and check back in o_O

    It’s 100% possible. I say this as I juggle over 200 incoming emails each day and NEVER finish the day with anything more than zero.

    First step – declare email bankruptcy

  • Loriann

    Member
    January 19, 2016 at 11:49 am

    Tried Inbox 0 over the summer, unsubscribed to many, but have since subscribed to more than I had before I unsubscribed. It’s time to get serious and my 1 week starts now!! Will give an update next Tuesday morning… as my accountability piece!! Have a great week and new semester for those of you that switch!!

  • Loriann

    Member
    January 19, 2016 at 11:50 am

    Active Inbox site denied by the State of Delaware! Off to a bad start, but won’t give up!!

  • Jarrod Robinson

    Administrator
    January 19, 2016 at 12:09 pm
    LoriannMinka, post: 234, member: 99 wrote:
    Tried Inbox 0 over the summer, unsubscribed to many, but have since subscribed to more than I had before I unsubscribed. It’s time to get serious and my 1 week starts now!! Will give an update next Tuesday morning… as my accountability piece!! Have a great week and new semester for those of you that switch!!

    Ok – Active Inbox is cool, but not essential to you being able to achieve it.

    Follow these steps and you’ve got the entire toolkit to make it happen

    • Turn all notifications off and don’t leave the email client open.
    • Process email in blocks throughout the day, for me this morning, sometimes lunch and evening. On the weekends, it usually moves to once per day.
    • First delete or archive as many new messages as possible. You can also unsubscribe to newsletters you don’t read
    • You should forward what can be best answered by someone else to someone else.
    • Immediately respond to any new messages that can be responded to in two minutes or less.
    • Move new messages that require more than two minutes to answer — and messages that can be answered later — to a separate “requires response” folder. This is what ‘Active Inbox’ automates for me.
    • Set aside time each day to respond to email in the “requires response” folder. I process this folder at the end of the day.
  • Lisa

    Member
    January 19, 2016 at 10:11 pm

    Great!
    Though, I do not use gmail or Chrome on home computer, so Active Inbox is not an option for me (I think) and since email is Comcast and we still use Safari, your post helps!
    Is switching from Safari to Chrome on Macbk pro all that is needed to use active inbox? Or is gmail needed too? Thanks!

  • Anonymous

    Deleted User
    January 20, 2016 at 12:34 pm

    I’m really interested in trying this, but I’m a bit confused as to how it works. Does ActiveInbox decide what requires more time and what does not? When you have to pay for the service, I guess I’m failing to understand how it may be more effective than myself at organizing and ensuring that I have 0 messages in my inbox. Can anybody explain it to me please?

  • Jarrod Robinson

    Administrator
    January 21, 2016 at 6:26 am
    DanielSummers, post: 241, member: 117 wrote:
    I’m really interested in trying this, but I’m a bit confused as to how it works. Does ActiveInbox decide what requires more time and what does not? When you have to pay for the service, I guess I’m failing to understand how it may be more effective than myself at organizing and ensuring that I have 0 messages in my inbox. Can anybody explain it to me please?

    Hey Daniel

    Active Inbox is non-essential in the process, however, I personally use it to help me manage my inbox ZERO. It is truly powerful, but at the end of the day it’s YOU who makes inbox zero possible by following these steps.

    • Turn all notifications off and don’t leave the email client open.
    • Process email in blocks throughout the day, for me this morning, sometimes lunch and evening. On the weekends, it usually moves to once per day.
    • First delete or archive as many new messages as possible. You can also unsubscribe to newsletters you don’t read
    • You should forward what can be best answered by someone else to someone else.
    • Immediately respond to any new messages that can be responded to in two minutes or less.
    • Move new messages that require more than two minutes to answer — and messages that can be answered later — to a separate “requires response” folder. This is what ‘Active Inbox’ automates for me. You can do this yourself with folders in your email system
    • Set aside time each day to respond to email in the “requires response” folder. I process this folder at the end of the day.
  • Jarrod Robinson

    Administrator
    January 21, 2016 at 6:27 am
    LisaBell, post: 237, member: 106 wrote:
    Great!
    Though, I do not use gmail or Chrome on home computer, so Active Inbox is not an option for me (I think) and since email is Comcast and we still use Safari, your post helps!
    Is switching from Safari to Chrome on Macbk pro all that is needed to use active inbox? Or is gmail needed too? Thanks!

    Don’t get too hung up on Active Inbox. Simpy follow the workflow and framework outlined in the post and you have all of the tools you need to make it happen

  • Brendon Breen

    Member
    January 26, 2016 at 8:06 am

    [ATTACH=full]5[/ATTACH] Finally! Now the challenge is to try and keep it that way.

    Thanks for the challenge.

    thepegeek, post: 191, member: 1 wrote:
    ACTIVE Inbox will help you get rid of those – if you follow the simple steps below you should be all set

    • Turn all notifications off and don’t leave the email client open.
    • Process email in blocks throughout the day, for me this morning, sometimes lunch and evening. On the weekends, it usually moves to once per day.
    • First delete or archive as many new messages as possible. You can also unsubscribe to newsletters you don’t read
    • You should forward what can be best answered by someone else to someone else.
    • Immediately respond to any new messages that can be responded to in two minutes or less.
    • Move new messages that require more than two minutes to answer — and messages that can be answered later — to a separate “requires response” folder. This is what ‘Active Inbox’ automates for me.
    • Set aside time each day to respond to email in the “requires response” folder. I process this folder at the end of the day.

    When you get a chance, copy/paste a screenshot of your emails inside this thread :)

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